Taking Liberty 1983" is a planned feature documentary about the personalities involved in the 1983 America’s Cup in Newport, Rhode Island between Australia II and Liberty

For 132 years the United States of America held the title in the most prestigious of all sailing competitions - the America’s Cup. It stands as the longest running sporting record ever. 

In September 1983 all that was to change. A motley crew of Australian sailors backed by the larger than life tycoon Alan Bond, challenged for the America’s Cup in the controversial boat Australia II. They achieved the impossible and beat the American boat Liberty. 

It sparked wild and unprecedented celebrations across Australia and became one of that nation’s greatest sporting moments. 

For the America’s Cup it was a game changer generating a burst of international interest - the result of which can still be seen today. 

Now, for the very first time, Taking Liberty – 1983 will tell the definitive story of this David and Goliath battle on the big screen.

If this sounds vaguely familiar, it’s because these are the real life events that inspired the movie Wind, staring Matthew Modine and Jennifer Grey. 

photojojo

photojojo:

The trailer for the Vivian Maier documentary is out, and it looks sogood.

You might recall the incredible story — Vivian was a nanny living a double life as a street photographer in the 50s and 60s but has since passed away.

Her work only recently discovered when a historian, John Maloof, found hundreds of thousands of developed and undeveloped negatives.

Watch the Vivian Maeier Documentary Trailer

Vanishing Sail - Trailer (by alexis andrews)

Shot in Carriacou in the Grenadines, where the last Caribbean boatbuilders maintain a tenuous grip on their traditional skills. In St. Barth’s where the smuggling trade in liquor & cigarettes thrived. And Antigua where the Carriacou vessels race each year among vintage yachts in the Classic Regatta.

Mixed with rare archive footage, interviews with the last old Caribbean sea captains - the film combines dramatic sailing footage with narration and an original soundtrack to tell the story of the Vanishing Sail of the West Indies.

So awesome. But where are the Pink Ladies?!

The City Dark is having its official World Premier at SXSW this weekend. The work in progress/sneak peek version I saw at CIFF last September (outside and under the stars) pretty much blew my mind. Go see it.

THE CITY DARK chronicles the disappearance of darkness. When filmmaker Ian Cheney moves to New York City and discovers skies almost completely devoid of stars, a simple question – what do we lose, when we lost the night? – spawns a journey to America’s brightest and darkest corners. Astronomers, cancer researchers, ecologists and philosophers provide glimpses of what is lost in the glare of city lights; blending a humorous, searching tone with poetic footage of the night sky, what unravels is an introduction to the science of the dark, and an exploration of the human relationship to the stars.

Exit Through the Gift Shop 

“Exit” is billed as “a Banksy film,” but Banksy, the notoriously reclusive British street artist, appears only rarely, face hooded and voice distorted. Even so, it is Banksy whom audiences will come hoping to see, stimulated by the canopy of hype that this artist has carefully erected, in interviews and on the festival circuit. What they will find is, like Banksy’s best work, a trompe l’oeil: a film that looks like a documentary but feels like a monumental con.

(NYT) 

Ultimately, wondering whether “Exit Through the Gift Shop” is real or not may be moot. It certainly asks real questions: about the value of authenticity, financially and aesthetically; about what it means to be a superstar in a subculture built on shunning the mainstream; about how sensibly that culture judges, and monetizes, talent.

(NYT)

Exit Through the Gift Shop 

“Exit” is billed as “a Banksy film,” but Banksy, the notoriously reclusive British street artist, appears only rarely, face hooded and voice distorted. Even so, it is Banksy whom audiences will come hoping to see, stimulated by the canopy of hype that this artist has carefully erected, in interviews and on the festival circuit. What they will find is, like Banksy’s best work, a trompe l’oeil: a film that looks like a documentary but feels like a monumental con.

(NYT

Ultimately, wondering whether “Exit Through the Gift Shop” is real or not may be moot. It certainly asks real questions: about the value of authenticity, financially and aesthetically; about what it means to be a superstar in a subculture built on shunning the mainstream; about how sensibly that culture judges, and monetizes, talent.

(NYT)

The President’s Photographer: Fifty Years Inside the Oval Office (Trailer)

If you follow the White House Flickr stream, you probably recognize the name, Pete Souza, the official photographer to the President. In this fascinating documentary, National Geographic chronicles Pete’s day to day activities in the White House (his office was previously the barber shop) and reflect upon monumental photographic moments by past Presidential photogs. Watch it on Netflix/PBS